Saturday, August 9, 2014

The Three Tigers

     When I was in second or third grade, we had to write a story that had to do with threes. Our examples were The Three Little Pigs and The Three Bears, but we could write whatever we wanted. It just had to involve three of something.

     My favorite animal was white tigers (still is, actually). I decided, I was going to write about The Three Tigers (Snowy, Snowball, and Snowflake. Shut up. I was like 8. I had a stray-adopted cat named Tiger and a house cat named Tigeress, names were not my strong suit.) They lived on an island and sort of ruled it, like Simba ruled The Pride Lands in The Lion King. (...Favorite movie since I was 2.)

     Well, thanks to my mom buying the non-fiction informational books about various large cats, I knew what poachers were and I thought they were some of the worst people in the world. I decided that since I was writing about tigers, the only logical bad guys would have to be poachers.

     The story went, that the poachers were tearing apart the island and hunting all of the animals. If they weren't in hiding, then they were hunted, so all the animals were hiding in the trees, the caves, and the water. Even the fish were avoiding the area. The tigers decided that something must be done about it, so they had a meeting together.

     They decided that the only way to get rid of the poachers was to scare them to their boats. Being three, angry tigers, they thought it would be simple enough. Then, from there, they could ask their underwater friends (I think I specifically said sharks, but I can't remember) to scare their boats all the way back across the ocean.

     One of the tigers, however, was concerned. It said, "What if it doesn't work? What if they come back?"

     Another tiger replied, "Well, there's always the volcano."

     I'm pretty sure that I ended it with the poachers never returning to the island and all of the animals living happily ever after or something. I was 8. That's how all stories end for an 8 year old.

     But let me get this straight- I was in grade school, openly discussing how poachers were such a huge problem, that they should be scared into a mother fucking volcano.

     I specifically remember wondering if my teacher and my mom were going to think that my story meant that I was bad, evil, or crazy. After I turned it in, I waited for like two months to see if I was going to get in trouble for having such a violent suggestion in my story. It never happened.

     I don't know if it's worse that I wondered if I would be in trouble or if it's worse that nobody questioned why an 8 year old was writing about potentially throwing people into a volcano. I asked my mom why she was never concerned that I might grow up to be a psychopath and she just laughed.

16 comments:

  1. The teacher and your mom and other people should have said, Wow! This child is brilliant! She understands what poachers are and that what they do is wrong. She's already an environmentalist. You should have been given an award for writing the best essay.

    As for throwing people in a volcano, that's the kind of thing you'd see in a movie or TV show. A lot of children have far more violent thoughts crawling through their brains than a volcano.

    You are not a psychopath, and you never were. You were a brilliant little girl, and now you are a brilliant young woman.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. I didn't know a lot of things that normal 8 year olds did, but I read those books religiously. I could have told you the exact weight and length of all the large cats. I used to get mad (still do) that people couldn't tell cheetahs from jaguars from leopards by their spots or confusing a lion with a lioness. It was a bit of an obsession problem haha.

      I don't know if I should have gotten an award but that comment makes me happy. It was the only story idea I had and I just had a feeling that was what I needed to write, whether or not I got in trouble for it. Maybe it was preparing me for blog writing?

      I think it's that kids have more violent thoughts than that. I don't remember which serial killer (I'm eating cereal so I originally misspelled it) it was, I think Bundy, but I read that he was putting knives in his family's beds when he was three and they thought it was normal. Doesn't say much for society.

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    2. Good God. Knives in bed. I'm glad my kids stuck to spoons.

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  2. I think it was pretty cool that you were concerned about poachers. I'd throw them into a volcano, too, and I'm not eight!

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    1. I mean, I would just throw them into a cage with whatever they're hunting. Or a volcano. I guess whichever is easier to get to at the time. But I was eight, so I have to wonder why I didn't just decide a fairy Godmother would zap them with her wand or something.

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  3. I have an entire list of people I want to throw into a volcano. Poachers most certainly included. I don't think that's too bad. I mean, you DID write a story about talking tigers. When it comes to children's stories, anyone sounds insane.

    "No, see, the talking wolf wants to eat Little Red Riding Hood so he dresses up in her grandma's clothes. What's so crazy about that?"

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    1. You have made a very good point. I guess I thought since adults were writing children's stories that would catch their attention and teach a lesson, I thought it was normal. But no, you're right, that sounds bat shit crazy. I did include talking tigers though. I can't remember if they could talk to anyone or just amongst themselves in animal languages, but still. I feel less insane now. Sort of.

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  4. That's a great story! I can see it as a disney movie...

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    1. As somebody with a Disney obsession, that makes me incredible happy and hopeful.

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    2. I agree with Gia. What a wonderful imagination!

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    3. !!!

      DISNEY HERE I COME.

      (Not to be confused with the parks, because I'm poor.)

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  5. My daughter is obsessed with cats. I was always interested in apes and black "panthers." I wouldn't be concerned with one of my kids writing about throwing bad guys into a volcano; it's just the way kids think. Their sense of justice is developing and they don't have a full sense of the permanence of death, or the larger details around it. Sounds like a well thought out story by a child that age! I just found blank pre-made books at the store for my kids and bought a couple packs. My daughter, age 6, was excited about writing some books and declared "This means I'm an author, doesn't it?" as she worked on one. This one's about horses, though, her other obsession.

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    1. I understood death pretty well, I think. I had already been to a funeral and I had lost a couple of pets by then. I'm just not sure I understood that volcanic death would be so horrible or what it would do to people, but I mean, it didn't involve all the icky details so that's probably a good sign.

      I didn't even know those were a thing! I always just used empty journals or a bunch of paper in a binder or folder.

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  6. what a great story! then and now!
    as an 8 yo, you had a wonderful imagination - giving proper consequences for horrible people. and its not like you went into gory details or stabbed or tortured them, then there might be reason for concern - or if you put someone you knew personally as one of the poachers... there might be questions.
    anonymous bad guys thrown into a volcano - awright!

    and i also wanted to thank you for stopping by my broken branch falls blog tour!

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    1. Thank you! You had some good points that make me feel less like a horrible person. haha

      I have to say though... I don't think I stopped by your blog? I don't remember doing so? I haven't been by any new blogs since the April A-Z challenge due to lack of time. (And now I'm back to being a horrible person.)

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